No Games Link With Violence

kids-playing-video-games

“We basically find that genetics and some social issues combine to predict later adult arrests. Despite ongoing concerns about media influences, media exposure does not seem to function as a risk factor for adult criminality. People may object morally to some of the content that exists in the media, but the question is whether the media can predict criminal behavior. The answer seems to be no.”

Dr. Christopher J. Ferguson, Texas A&M International University associate professor of psychology. (Polygon)

Violence the Easy Option?

gta31.0_cinema_960.0

“With any storytelling medium or any medium at all, you want to have conflict because that’s how you can generate interest, and oftentimes the simplest or most base way to do that is through violence that isn’t necessarily tied into a deeper, more meaningful story. I think it’s often easier to do violence than it is to generate meaningful, interesting conflict through nonviolent ways.”

Former GTA producer Jeremy Pope, who has sworn off violent games. (GamesIndustry)

Violent Games at Sleepy Time

violent-video-games2

“The violent game seems to have elicited more stress at bedtime in both groups, and it also seems as if the violent game in general caused some kind of exhaustion. However, the exhaustion didn’t seem to be of the kind that normally promotes good sleep, but rather as a stressful factor that can impair sleep quality.”

Malena Ivarsson, of the Stress Research Institute at Stockholm University in Sweden, following an investigation into children playing violent games before bedtime. (GamePolitics)

Preference of Violent Video Games

kidsplayinggames

“Although researchers have often noted the preference of violent video games by many school shooters, given that 97 percent of adolescents play video games such a preference is not overly surprising. It could similarly be argued that bread consumption predicts school shootings, because most school shooters likely consumed a bread product within 24 hours before their violent attacks.”

Dr. Patrick Markey, associate professor of psychology at Villanova University. (GamePolitics)